I started diving when I was around 8, and started shooting underwater as soon as a hand-me-down camera was available from my brother, Kris, who is 6 years older. Officially certified when I was 12, I had an extremely fortunate childhood thanks to my parents, Any and Les, who had a healthy obsession with traveling. While my friends were attending sports camp each summer, or bundled up making snowmen during Christmas break here in Ontario, Canada, we were exploring just about every island in the Caribbean, and photographing everything along the way (on thousands of rolls of film). Now 30 years old, around 20 years have passed since I picked up my first underwater camera, and there isn't an end in sight. 

When my brother was 15 (21 years ago), he started ReefNet - a company whose motto sums up the company's purpose quite nicely: "Solving problems with deep thinking". We now co-own ReefNet, and as engineers, we actively design and manufacture products that benefit the underwater world (optics, data recorders, marine life ID guides, etc.). 

As a late teenager, I started entering underwater photo competitions, and winning. A lot. In the span of 6 years, I won over 100 awards in international photo competitions, and had more dive travel vouchers (prizes) than I could possibly cash in on before they expired. Since then, I've stopped entering competitions, and am regularly asked to judge them instead, which is equally rewarding.

keri with dolphin.jpg

More recently, I started a bold new journey into the field of aerial imaging using unmanned aerial systems (aka drones, quadcopters, or multirotors). I started a company called Rotorpixel, which primarily manufactures direct-drive camera-stabilizing gimbals for unmanned aerial systems... that's a bit of a mouthful, but check out Rotorpixel to get a better idea of what I'm talking about.

That's all, for now.

Keri

 

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